CV

Cynthia Brame’s CV

Contact information

Mail:
Center for Teaching
Peabody Box #183
230 Appleton Place
Nashville, TN 37203

Office: 1114 19th Avenue South
Phone: 615-322-7290
Email: cynthia.brame [at] vanderbilt.edu

Education

  • Ph.D., Pharmacology, Vanderbilt University, 1999
  • B.S., magna cum laude, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Centre College, 1994

Professional experience

  • Associate Director, Center for Teaching, Vanderbilt University, 2018-present
  • Senior Lecturer, Department of Biological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, 2012-present
  • Assistant Director, Center for Teaching, Vanderbilt University, 2012-2018
  • Associate Professor, Department of Biology, Centenary College of Lousiana, 2009-2012
  • Chair, Department of Biology, Centenary College of Lousiana, 2009-2012
  • Assistant Professor, Department of Biology, Centenary College of Louisiana, 2003-2009
  • Assistant Professor, gratis appointment, LSU-Health Sciences Center-Shreveport, 2004-2012
  • Assistant Professor (one year appointment), Department of Biology, Mary Baldwin College, 2002-2003
  • Research Scientist, MDS-Proteomics, 2001-2002
  • Postdoctoral Fellow with Donald F. Hunt, 1999-2001

Publications

Book

  • Science Teaching Essentials: Short Guides to Good Practice. In press: Elsevier, February 2019.

Articles/book chapters (* undergraduate coauthors; ** graduate coauthors)

  • Knight JK and Brame CJ. Peer Instruction. CBE Life Sciences Education, doi: 10.1187/cbe.18-02-0025, 2018. An introduction to the Peer Instruction Evidence-Based Teaching guide, found at https://lse.ascb.org/evidence-based-teaching-guides/peer-instruction/.
  • Wilson KJ and Brame CJ. Helping practitioners and researchers identify and use education research literature. CBE Life Sciences Education doi: 10.1111/idh.12334, 2018. An introduction to the Evidence-Based Teaching Guides feature of CBE Life Sciences Education, found at https://lse.ascb.org/.
  • Wilson KJ, Brickman P, and Brame CJ. Group Work. CBE Life Sciences Education doi: 10.1187/cbe.17-12-0258, 2018. An introduction to the Group Work Evidence-Based Teaching guide, found at https://lse.ascb.org/evidence-based-teaching-guides/group-work/.
  • Bowen RS**, Picard DR**, Verberne-Sutton S and Brame CJ. Incorporating student design in an HPLC lab activity promotes student metacognition and argumentation. Journal of Chemical Education, doi: 10.1021/acs.jchemed7b00258, 2018.
  • Krimm H**, Schuele CM, Brame CJ. Viability of online learning for ensuring basic skills in speech-language pathology. Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG10.49, 2017.
  • Hande K, Parish AL, Cook C, Glassford MA, Pitts CJ, Richmond A, Widmar SB, Brame CJ, and Kennedy B. Junior Faculty Teaching Fellowship: A model to support nursing education development. Nurse Educator DOI: 10.1097/NNE.0000000000000413, 2017.
  • Green NH**, McMahon DG, and Brame CJ. Using online active-learning techniques to convey time compensated sun compass orientation in the Eastern North American Monarch. Journal of Microbiology and Biology Education 17, 430-435, 2016.
  • Biel R* and Brame CJ. Traditional versus online biology courses: Connecting course design and student learning in an online setting. Journal of Microbiology and Biology Education 17, 417-422, 2016.
  • Brame CJ. Effective educational videos: Principles and guidelines for maximizing student learning from video content. CBE-Life Sciences Education 15, pii:es6, 2016.
  • Hamrin V, Vick R, Brame CJ, Simmons M, Vanderhoef D, and Smith L. Teaching a systems approach: An innovative quality improvement project. Journal of Nursing Education 55, 209-214, 2016.
  • Brame CJ and Biel R*. Test-enhanced learning: The potential for testing to promote greater learning in undergraduate science courses. CBE-Life Sciences Education 14, 1-12, 2015.
  • Ortega RA** and Brame CJ. The synthesis map is a multi-dimensional educational tool that provides insight into students’ mental models and promotes students’ synthetic knowledge generation. CBE- Life Sciences Education 14, 1-11, 2015.
  • Chick N and Brame CJ. An investigation of the products and impact of graduate student SoTL programs: Observations and recommendations from a single institution. International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning 9, No. 1, Article 3, 2015. Available at http://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/ij-sotl/vol9/iss1/3.
  • Rao AS, Fan J**, Brame CJ, and Landman BA. Improving conceptual understanding of signals and systems in undergraduate engineering students using collaborative in-class laboratory exercises. 2014 ASEE Annual Conference, paper ID #9790. Available at http://www.asee.org/public/conferences/32/papers/9790/view.
  • Chiang H*, Robinson LC, Brame CJ, and Messina TM. Molecular mechanics and dynamics characterization of an in silico mutated protein: A stand-alone lab module or support activity for in vivo and in vitro analyses of targeted protein. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 41: 402-408, 2013.
  • Brame CJ, Pruitt WM, and Robinson LC. A molecular genetics laboratory course applying bioinformatics and cell biology in the context of original research. CBE—Life Sciences Education 7: 410-421, 2008.
  • Davies SS, Amarnath V, Brame CJ, Boutaud O, and Roberts LJ, II. Measurement of chronic oxidative and inflammatory stress by quantification of isoketal/levuglandin g-ketoaldehyde protein adducts using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Nature Protocols 2: 2079-2091, 2007.
  • WebbDJ, Schroeder MJ, Brame CJ, Whitmore L, Shabanowitz J, Hunt DF,  and Horwitz, AR. Paxillin phosphorylation sites mapped by mass spectrometry. J. Cell Science 118: 4925-4929, 2005.
  • Moran MF, White F, Marto J, Brame CJ, Ornatsky O, Ross M, Toledo-Sherman LM, Castro A, Duewel H, Hosfield C, Orsi C, Topaloglou T, Figeys D, Caldwell-Busby J, and Stover DR. Phospho-proteomics in drug discovery and development. Chapter in: Protein Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Cancer Therapy. D. Fabbro and F. McCormick, eds. Humana Press, 2004.
  • Marto JA, Brame CJ, Ficarro SB, White FM, Shabanowitz J, and Hunt DF. Sequence analysis: Low energy MS/MS-Peptide Interpretation. Chapter in: Encyclopedia of Mass Spectrometry, Volume 2: Biological Applications. R. Caprioli and M. Gross, eds. Elsevier, 2004.
  • Marto JA, Brame CJ, Ficarro SB, White FM, Shabanowitz J, and Hunt DF. Chemical derivitization for peptide sequence analysis and consideration for sequence analysis of peptides subjected to posttranslational modifications. Chapter in: Encyclopedia of Mass Spectrometry, Volume 2: Biological Applications. R. Caprioli and M. Gross, eds. Elsevier, 2004.
  • Brame CJ, Moran MF, and McBroom-Cerajewski, LD. A mass spectrometry-based method for distinguishing between symmetrically and asymmetrically dimethylated arginine residues. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrom. 18: 877-81, 2004.
  • Brame CJ, Boutaud O, Davies S, Yang T, Oates JA, Salomon RG, Roden DM, Morrow JD, and Roberts LJ, II. Modification of proteins by isoketal-containing oxidized phospholipids. J. Biol. Chem. 279: 13447-51, 2004.
  • Zarling AL, Luckey CJ, Marto JA, White FM, Brame CJ, Evans AM, Lehner PJ, Cresswell P, Shabanowitz J, Hunt DF, and Engelhard VH. Tapasin is a facilitator, not an editor, of class I MHC peptide binding. J Immunol. 171: 5287-95, 2003.
  • Davies SS, Brame CJ, Boutaud O, and Roberts LJ, II. Measurement of isoketal protein adducts by liquid chromatography electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. Chapter in: Methods in Biological Oxidative Stress. K. Hensley and RA Floyd, eds., pp 127-136, 2003.
  • Harnpicharnchai P, Jakovljevid J, Horsey E, Miles T, Roman J, Rout M, Meagher D, Imai B, Guo Y, Brame CJ, Shabanowitz J, Hunt DF, and Woolford JL, Jr. Composition and functional characterization of yeast 66S ribosome assembly intermediates. Mol Cell 8: 505-515, 2001.
  • Boutaud O, Li J, Chaurand P, Brame CJ, Marnett LJ, Roberts LJ, II, and Oates JA. Oxygenation of arachidonic acid by cyclooxygenases generates reactive intermediates that form adducts with proteins. Adv Exp Med Biol. 500:133-137, 2001.
  • Strahl BD, Briggs SD, Brame CJ, Caldwell JA, Koh SS, Ma H, Cook RG, Shabanowitz J, Hunt DF, Stallcup MR, and Allis CD. Methylation of histone H4 at arginine 3 occurs in vivo and is mediated by the nuclear receptor coactivator PRMT1. Curr. Biol. 11: 996-1000, 2001.
  • Boutaud O, Brame CJ,Chaurand P, Li J, Rowlinson SW, Crews BC, Ji C Marnett LJ, Caprioli RM, Roberts LJ, II, and Oates JA. Characterization of the lysyl adducts of prostaglandin H-synthases that are derived from oxygenation of arachidonic acid. Biochemistry 40: 6948-6955, 2001.
  • Mosammaparast N, Jackson KR, Guo Y, Brame CJ, Shabanowitz J, Hunt DF, and Pemberton LF. Nuclear import of histone H2A and H2B is mediated by a network of karyopherins, including Kap114p, Kap121p, Kap123p, and Kap95p. J. Cell. Biol. 153: 251-262, 2001.
  • Roberts LJ, II, Chen Y, Boutaud O, Davies SS, Morrow JD, Oates JA, and Brame CJ. Reactive products of the isoprostane pathway: isoketals and cyclopentenone A2/J2-isoprostanes. Chapter in: Advances in Prostaglanding and Leukotriene Research: Basic Science and New Clinical Applications. B. Samuelsson, R. Paoletti, GC Folco, E. Granstrom, and S. Nicosia, eds. Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2001.
  • Hsu J-Y, Sun Z-W, Li X, Reuben M, Tatchell K, Biship DK, Grushcow JM, Brame CJ, Caldwell JA, Hunt DF, Lin R, Smith MM, and Allis CD. Mitotic phosphorylation of histone H3 is governed by Ipl1/aurora kinase and Glc7/PP1 phosphatase in budding yeast and nematodes. Cell 102: 279-291, 2000.
  • Reich EE, Zackert WE, Brame CJ, Chen Y, Roberts LJ, II, Hachey DL, Montine TJ, and Morrow JD. Formation of novel D-ring and E-ring isoprostane-like compounds (D-4/E-4-neuroprostanes) in vivo from docosahexaenoic acid. Biochemistry 29: 2376-2383, 2000.
  • Roberts LJ, II, Brame CJ, Chen Y, and Morrow JD. Formation of novel reactive products via the isoprostane pathway. In: Proc. 5th Internat. Conf. On Eicosanoids and Other Bioactive Lipids in Cancer, Inflammation, and Other Related Diseases. KV Honn, S Nigam, L Marnett, and E Dennis, eds., Plenum Publishers, 2000.
  • Salomon RG, Sha W, Brame CJ, Kaur K, Subbanagounder G, O’Neil J, Hoff HF, and Roberts LJ, II. Protein adducts of iso[4]levuglandin E2 in oxidized low density lipoprotein. J. Biol. Chem. 274: 20271-20280, 1999.
  • Brame CJ, Boutaud O, Oates JA, and Roberts LJ, II. Characterization of lysyl adducts formed by the -ketoaldehyde prostanoids LGE2/D2. Biochemistry 38: 9389-9396, 1999.
  • Roberts LJ, II, Salomon RG, Morrow JD, and Brame CJ. New developments in the isoprostane pathway: identification of novel highly reactive -ketoaldehydes (isolevuglandins) and characterization of their protein adducts. FASEB J. 13: 1157-1168, 1999.
  • Roberts LJ, II, Brame CJ, Chen Y, Morrow JD, and Salomon RG. Formation of reactive products of the isoprostane pathway: isolevuglandins and cyclopenteneone isoprostanes. Adv. Exp. Med. & Biol. 469: 335-341, 1999.
  • Brame CJ, Salomon RG, Morrow JD, and Roberts LJ, II. Identification of extremely reactive -ketoaldehydes as products of the isoprostane pathway. J. Biol. Chem. 274: 13139-13146, 1999.
  • Roberts LJ, II, Brame CJ, Chen Y, and Morrow JD. Novel eicosanoids: Isoprostanes and related compounds. Methods Mol. Biol. 120: 257-285, 1999.
  • Morrow JD, Chen Y, Brame CJ, Yang J, Sanchez SC, Xu J, Zackert WE, Awad JA, and Roberts LJ, II. The isoprostanes: unique prostaglandin-like products of free radical-catalyzed lipid peroxidation. Drug Metab. Rev. 31, 117-139, 1999.
  • Subbanagounder G, Salomon RG, Murthi KK, Brame CJ, and Roberts LJ, II. Total synthesis of iso[4]-levuglandin E2. J. Org. Chem. 62: 7658-7666, 1997.